Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Can suggestions of non-occurrence lead to claims that witnessed events did not happen?

Authors
  • Azad, Tanjeem1
  • Lindsay, D Stephen2
  • Zaragoza, Maria S1
  • 1 Kent State University.
  • 2 University of Victoria.
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of general psychology
Publication Date
Dec 16, 2020
Pages
1–22
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/00221309.2020.1860889
PMID: 33325328
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In three experiments, we examined whether general suggestions of non-occurrence -suggestions that experienced events did not occur- would lead participants to claim that events they witnessed never happened. Participants viewed a video depicting the investigation of a child kidnapping case and subsequently were exposed to suggestions of non-occurrence either once (Experiments 1 and 3) or three times (Experiments 2 and 3). The results provided no evidence that single suggestions of non-occurrence influenced participants' memories or belief (Experiments 1 and 3). However, in two experiments (E2 and E3) the results provided clear evidence that repeated elaboration of suggestions of non-occurrence led participants to claim that the events they witnessed never happened. The finding that participants were influenced by repeated, but not single elaboration of suggestions of non-occurrence shows that reflective elaboration processes played an important role in leading participants to disbelieve the events they had witnessed.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times