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Can social media intervention improve physical activity of medical students?

Authors
  • Todorovic, J1
  • Terzic-Supic, Z2
  • Djikanovic, B3
  • Nesic, D4
  • Piperac, P5
  • Stamenkovic, Z6
  • 1 Institute of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 15, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia; Centre School for Public Health and Health Management, Pasterova 2, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Serbia)
  • 2 Institute of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 15, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia; Centre School for Public Health and Health Management, Pasterova 2, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Serbia)
  • 3 Institute of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 15, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia; Centre School for Public Health and Health Management, Pasterova 2, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Serbia)
  • 4 Institute of Medical Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 8, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Serbia)
  • 5 Department for Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Serbia)
  • 6 Institute of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotica 15, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia; Centre School for Public Health and Health Management, Pasterova 2, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Serbia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Public health
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2019
Volume
174
Pages
69–73
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2019.05.030
PMID: 31323599
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Physical activity level decreases during young adulthood. As social media are nowadays widely used and are included into many people's daily routines, the interventions on these websites have the possibilities to be integrated into those routines without becoming a burden. The aim of this study was to assess physical activity level among first- and fifth-year medical students and social media intervention with the aim to improve physical activity among them. Prospective longitudinal study was conducted during October of 2016 at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia. The study included 375 first- and fifth-year students. At the baseline, students filled in the questionnaire and were asked to join a Facebook discussion group. The intervention consisted of motivation for physical activity through motivational pictures, texts, and discussions. The second assessment was carried out after one month. Based on the reported physical activity level, students were divided into groups: sufficient (>600 metabolic equivalent [MET]-minutes/week) and insufficient physical activity (≤600 MET-minutes/week). Total of 85.4% of students were sufficiently active at the baseline, whereas 90.4% were sufficiently active after one month. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that students who were part of the Facebook group (odds ratio [OR]: 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-8.43) and students who had sufficient physical activity at the baseline (OR: 5.44, 95% CI: 2.44-12.13) had a higher likelihood to be sufficiently active after one month. Social media are shown to be valuable in health-promoting interventions and can be used for interventions targeting lifestyle change among young adults. Copyright © 2019 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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