Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Can milk proteins be a useful tool in the management of cardiometabolic health? An updated review of human intervention trials.

Authors
  • Fekete, Ágnes A1
  • Givens, D Ian2
  • Lovegrove, Julie A1
  • 1 Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences,Faculty of Life Sciences,Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition and Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research (ICMR), University of Reading,Reading RG6 6AR,UK.
  • 2 Food Production and Quality Research Division,School of Agriculture, Policy and Development,Faculty of Life Sciences,University of Reading,Reading RG6 6AR,UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Proceedings of The Nutrition Society
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
August 2016
Volume
75
Issue
3
Pages
328–341
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S0029665116000264
PMID: 27150497
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The prevalence of cardiometabolic diseases is a significant public health burden worldwide. Emerging evidence supports the inverse association between greater dairy consumption and reduced risk of cardiometabolic diseases. Dairy proteins may have an important role in the favourable impact of dairy on human health such as blood pressure (BP), blood lipid and glucose control. The purpose of this review is to update and critically evaluate the evidence on the impacts of casein and whey protein in relation to metabolic function. Evidence from short-term clinical studies assessing postprandial responses to milk protein ingestion suggests benefits on vascular function independent of BP, as well as improvement in glycaemic homeostasis. Long-term interventions have been less conclusive, with some showing benefits and others indicating a lack of improvement in vascular function. During chronic consumption BP appears to be lowered and both dyslipidaemia and hyperglacaemia seem to be controlled. Limited number of trials investigated the effects of dairy proteins on oxidative stress and inflammation. Although the underlying mechanisms of milk proteins on cardiometabolic homeostasis remains to be elucidated, the most likely mechanism is to improve insulin resistance. The incorporation of meals enriched with dairy protein in the habitual diet may result in the beneficial effects on cardiometabolic health. Nevertheless, future well-designed, controlled studies are needed to investigate the relative effects of both casein and whey protein on BP, vascular function, glucose homeostasis and inflammation.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times