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Can compliment and complaint data inform the care of individuals with chronic subdural haematoma (cSDH)?

Authors
  • Jones, Katherine1
  • Davies, Benjamin2
  • Stubbs, Daniel J2
  • Komashie, Alexander3
  • Burnstein, Rowan M3
  • Hutchinson, Peter2
  • Santarius, Thomas2
  • Joannides, Alexis J2
  • 1 University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK , Cambridge
  • 2 University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK , Cambridge
  • 3 University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, UK , Cambridge
Type
Published Article
Journal
BMJ Open Quality
Publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
Publication Date
Sep 17, 2021
Volume
10
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/bmjoq-2020-001246
PMID: 34535455
PMCID: PMC8451295
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • 1506
License
Unknown

Abstract

Objectives To explore the frequency and nature of complaints and compliments reported to Patient Advice and Liaison (PALS) in individuals undergoing surgery for a chronic subdural haematoma (cSDH). Design A retrospective study of PALS user interactions. Subjects Individuals undergoing treatment for cSDH between 2014 and 2019. Methods PALS referrals from patients with cSDH between 2014 and 2019 were identified. Case records were reviewed and data on the frequency, nature and factors leading up to the complaint were extracted and coded according to Healthcare Complaints Analysis Tool (HCAT). Results Out of 531 patients identified, 25 (5%) had a PALS interaction, of which 15 (3%) were complaints and 10 (2%) were compliments. HCAT coding showed 8/15 (53%) of complaints were relationship problems, 6/15 (33%) a management problem and 1/15 (7%) other. Of the relationship problems, 6 (75%) were classed as problems with communication and 2 (25%) as a problem with listening. Of the compliments, 9/10 (90%) related to good clinical quality and 1/10 (10%) to staff–patient relationship. Patients were more likely to register a compliment than family members, who in turn were more likely to register a complaint (p<0.005). Complaints coded as a relationship problem had 2/8 (25%) submitted by a patient and 6/8 (75%) submitted by a relative. Conclusions Using the HCAT, routinely collected PALS data can easily be coded to quantify and provide unique perspective on tertiary care, such as communication. It is readily suited to quality improvement and audit initiatives.

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