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Calcium phosphopeptides -- mechanisms of action and evidence for clinical efficacy.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Advances in dental research
Publication Date
Volume
24
Issue
2
Pages
41–47
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0022034512454294
PMID: 22899678
Source
Medline

Abstract

Phosphoproteins/phosphopeptides with clusters of acidic residues are found throughout nature, where they aid in the prevention of unwanted precipitation of solid calcium phosphates. The acidic residues, particularly phosphoserine, interact with calcium and stabilize clusters of calcium and phosphate. Saliva and milk are two examples of biological fluids that contain such phosphoprotein/phosphopeptide-stabilized calcium phosphates, and both share a similar evolutionary pathway. Saliva has been shown to have remineralization potential and is of critical importance in maintaining the mineral content of teeth in the oral environment. Milk can be enzymatically modified to release casein phosphopeptides that contain the clusters of residues that allow milk to stabilize high concentrations of calcium and phosphate. These casein phosphopeptide-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplexes (CPP-ACP) can stabilize even higher concentrations of calcium and phosphate than milk and can be considered a salivary biomimetic, since they share many similarities to statherin. The mechanisms of action and the growing body of scientific evidence that supports the use of CPP-ACP to augment fluoride in inhibiting demineralization and enhancing the remineralization of white-spot lesions are reviewed.

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