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Left ventricular remodelling and hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis: insights from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

Authors
Journal
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
1097-6647
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
13
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1532-429x-13-s1-o37
Keywords
  • Oral Presentation
Disciplines
  • Mathematics

Abstract

Left ventricular remodelling and hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis: insights from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging ORAL PRESENTATION Open Access Left ventricular remodelling and hypertrophy in patients with aortic stenosis: insights from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging Marc R Dweck1*, Sanjiv Joshi1, Tim Murigu1, Ankur Gulati1, Isabelle Roussin1, Andrew Jabbour1, Winston Banya1, Alicia Maceira1, Francisco Alpendurada1, Nicholas Boon2, Raad Mohiaddin1, David Newby2, Dudley Pennel1, Sanjay Prasad1 From 2011 SCMR/Euro CMR Joint Scientific Sessions Nice, France. 3-6 February 2011 Introduction The response of the left ventricular myocardium to aor- tic stenosis has been incompletely characterised. Here, we sought to investigate the correlation between the severity of aortic stenosis and the hypertrophic response and to define the patterns of remodelling and hypertro- phy with CMR. Methods Consecutive patients with moderate or severe AS (aortic valve area <1.5cm2), normal coronary arteries and no other significant valve lesion or cardiomyopathy were scanned by 1.5T magnetic resonance and compared with contemporary age- and sex-matched healthy, control sub- jects. The extent and patterns of hypertrophy were assessed from volumetric cine images. Valve severity was assessed by planimetry and velocity mapping. Asymmetric forms of remodelling and hypertrophy were defined as having a septal-to-lateral wall thickness ratio >1.5. Results Ninety-one patients (61±21 years;63% male) with aortic stenosis (AVA 0.93±0.32cm2) underwent CMR. The degree of hypertrophy was unrelated to aortic stenosis severity (p=0.53) and there was a wide variation in LV structure comprising normal ventricular geometry (n=11), concentric remodelling (n=11), asymmetric remodelling (n=11), concentric hypertrophy (n=33), asymmetric hypertrophy(n=15) and eccentric hypertro- phy (n=10). Asymmetric forms of remodelling and hypertrophy were observed in 29% of the cohort with considerable overlap in appear

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