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Penile Metastases of Recurrent Prostatic Adenocarcinoma without PSA Level Increase: A Case Report

Authors
Journal
Journal of Clinical Imaging Science
2156-7514
Publisher
Medknow Publications
Publication Date
Volume
2
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.99178
Keywords
  • Case Report
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

We report a case of penile metastases from recurrent prostatic adenocarcinoma that was the first sign of a widespread metastatic disease in the absence of any increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. In April 2011, an 80-year-old man presented to our Radiotherapy Unit with multiple palpable hard nodules in the penis, dysuria, and moderate perineal pain, 7 years after he had received radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Nodules in the penis had appeared in February 2011. The ultrasound and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging suggested the diagnosis of multiple penile metastases. A total body computed tomography scan revealed a systemic spread of the disease, with multiple metastases in the liver, bones, and lungs. PSA level was 0.126 ng/ml. A fine needle aspiration biopsy of the liver lesion was undertaken, and the histopathologic examination revealed the prostatic origin of the metastases, so androgen deprivation therapy was started. The diagnosis of metastases should be considered in a patient with prior history of prostate malignancies presenting with solid nodules in the penis, even if the PSA level is low.

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