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Rather than words: Philip Larkin's 'High Windows'

Word & Image
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
DOI: 10.1080/02666280903532777
  • Economics
  • Linguistics
  • Logic
  • Philosophy


Microsoft Word - ICICKM_v8mf_nc.doc COVER SHEET This is the author version of an article published as: Foth, Marcus and Odendaal, Nancy and Hearn, Gregory N. (2007) The View from Everywhere: Towards an Epistemology for Urbanites. In Proceedings 4th International Conference on Intellectual Capital, Knowledge Management and Organisational Learning (ICICKM), Cape Town, South Africa. Copyright 2007 (please consult author) Accessed from The View from Everywhere: Towards an Epistemology for Urbanites Marcus Foth1, Nancy Odendaal2, Greg Hearn1 1 Institute for Creative Industries and Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia 2 School of Architecture, Planning and Housing, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] Abstract: Information and knowledge management in line with a traditional epistemology equates knowledge with science. This approach assumes that knowing is trans-historical and universal, and strives to arrive at unassailable justifications for truth claims by defining the necessary and sufficient conditions for which a proposition is known to be true. Imagining an idealised knower, without emotions or history, the goal is absolute abstraction and universal solutions. Traditional epistemologists operate under the assumption that certainty is only achieved by stripping away all but the bare reasoning required to make inferences; thus rendering the social, historical and economic context of the knower irrelevant. The perspective of this idealised knower is a ‘view from nowhere’ (Nagel, 1986). In this paper we analyse and critique this view in the light of its applicability to the situation and needs of urban dwellers. The findings of our analysis allow us to call for a broadening of knowledge discourse beyond science and technology. We argue for the devel

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