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Ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

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  • Research Article
  • Medicine


WNL204717 56..57 DOI 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182834b22 2013;80;e56-e59 Neurology Alejandro A. Rabinstein Subarachnoid hemorrhage This information is current as of January 28, 2013 located on the World Wide Web at: The online version of this article, along with updated information and services, is Neurology. All rights reserved. Print ISSN: 0028-3878. Online ISSN: 1526-632X. since 1951, it is now a weekly with 48 issues per year. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of ® is the official journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Published continuouslyNeurology PATIENT PAGE Section Editors David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Alejandro A. Rabinstein, MD Subarachnoid hemorrhage Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can result from the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm—a weakened, dilated area of a blood vessel in the brain that is prone to burst. SAH can be devastating. Approximately 1 in 6 patients dies at the time of the bleeding. Those who initially survive can die after early rebleeding or have major complications. The complications of SAH include strokes from delayed spasm of blood vessels in the brain even after the aneurysm that caused the hemorrhage is treated. Most of the research on SAH has been focused on this early phase. Less is known about what happens longer term to those patients who survive SAH. Patients who have had an SAH—and their fami- lies—often have many questions when they leave the hospital. How will I recover? What is the risk that this could happen again? How can I prevent this from happening again? Am I at risk of other diseases? Those are some of the most common questions asked. Good recovery is possible, although some patients will be left with physical limitations or problems with their thinking. In those cases, long periods of rehabili- tation are important to provide the best chances of recovery. SAH can happen to the same person again. Because of this, patients need to continue to

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