Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Effects of 14 days of spaceflight and nine days of recovery on cell body size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

Authors
Journal
Neuroscience
0306-4522
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
81
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/s0306-4522(97)00097-3
Keywords
  • Microgravity
  • Oxidative Potential
  • Quantitative Histochemistry
  • Sensory Neurons
  • Spaceflight

Abstract

Abstract The cross-sectional areas and succinate dehydrogenase activities of L 5 dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after nine days of recovery. The mean and distribution of the cross-sectional areas were similar to age-matched, ground-based controls for both the spaceflight and for the spaceflight plus recovery groups. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in spaceflight compared to aged-matched control rats, whereas the mean succinate dehydrogenase activity was similar in age-matched control and spaceflight plus recovery rats. The mean succinate dehydrogenase activity of neurons with cross-sectional areas between 1,000 and 2,000 μm 2 was lower (between 7 and 10%) in both the spaceflight and the spaceflight plus recovery groups compared to the appropriate control groups. The reduction in the oxidative capacity of a subpopulation of sensory neurons having relatively large cross-sectional areas immediately following spaceflight and the sustained depression for nine days after returning to 1 g suggest that the 0 g environment induced significant alterations in proprioceptive function.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.