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The neuropeptide schistosomin and haemolymph from parasitized snails induce similar changes in excitability in neuroendocrine cells controlling reproduction and growth in a freshwater snail

Authors
Journal
Neuroscience Letters
0304-3940
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
136
Issue
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/0304-3940(92)90047-b
Keywords
  • Host-Parasite Interaction
  • Trichobilharzia
  • Schistosomin
  • Neuropeptide
  • Reproduction
  • Electrophysiology
  • Mollusc
  • Caudodorsal Cell
  • Light Green Cell
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract Infection of the snail Lymnaea stagnalis with the schistosome parasite Trichobilharzia ocellata results in inhibition of reproduction and in giant growth. Parasite-related effects on the neuroendocrine centres that control these processes were studied electrophysiologically. Haemolymph from infected snails reduced the excitability of the caudodorsal cells, which control egg laying. In contrast, the excitability of the growth-controlling Light Green Cells was increased under these conditions. The endogenous anti-gonadotropic neuropeptide schistosomin, the presence of which is strongly enhanced in parasitized snails, induced similar effects. Schistosomin apparently plays an important role in the balance between reproduction and growth in Lymnaea. This balance is severely disturbed during parasitic infection, probably as a result of the release of the peptide.

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