Affordable Access

Modulation of lymphocyte nuclear matrix organizationin vivoby 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl benzimidazole: an autoradiographic and immunofluorescence study

Authors
Journal
Biology of the Cell
0248-4900
Publisher
Wiley Blackwell (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Lymphocyte Stimulation
  • Inhibition Of Transcription
  • Nuclear Matrix
  • Snrnps
  • Nuclear Structural Reorganization
Disciplines
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Medicine

Abstract

Abstract Assembly of active nuclei in lymphocytes stimulated by mitogen is paralleled by the elaboration of a structurally and biochemically complex nuclear matrix (NM). To examine the dynamics of individual NM polypeptide components during blastogenesis, we have applied immunofluorescence labelling with anti-NM antibodies to concanavalin A-stimulated mouse splenocytes. Whereas peripherin and PI2 antigens did not reorganize during stimulation, labelling of PI1 and small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) antigens increased markedly in intensity and redistributed in concert with the previously reported NM restructuring. Double-labelling showed, furthermore, that snRNPs and the internal staining component of P11 were largely co-localized. As an approach to studying the role of RNA and RNA synthesis in NM organization, we have further examined the effects of the inhibitor of RNA synthesis, 5,6-dichloro-1-β- D-ribofuranosyl benzimidazole (DRB), on NM antigen distribution. The rapid inhibition of 3H-uridine incorporation by DRB was accompanied by coordinate aggregation of snRNPs and of the internal PI1 component into large, brightly stained patches. Both 3H-uridine incorporation levels and antigen localization were readily reversed upon removal of DRB. We conclude that NM antigens behave independently during nuclear and NM assembly and that NM organization, as reflected by NM antigen distribution, is modulated by con A- and DRB-induced alterations in RNA synthesis. We propose, furthermore, that the PI1 antigen plays a role in RNA metabolism, and is possibly involved in RNA transport to the nuclear periphery.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.