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Burnout syndrome and resilience in medical students from a Brazilian public college in Salvador, Brazil.

Authors
  • Dias, Alan Roger1
  • Fernandes, Santiago Mozart1
  • Fialho-Silva, Ivã1
  • Cerqueira-Silva, Thiago1
  • Miranda-Scippa, Ângela1
  • Galvão-de Almeida, Amanda1
  • 1 Departamento de Neurociências e Saúde Mental, Faculdade de Medicina de Bahia (FMB), Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA, Brazil. , (Brazil)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Trends in psychiatry and psychotherapy
Publication Date
Jun 15, 2021
Identifiers
DOI: 10.47626/2237-6089-2020-0187
PMID: 34139116
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Burnout syndrome is highly prevalent among medical students. Whereas burnout syndrome has been associated with negative outcomes, like suicidal ideation, protective factors are still unknown. To evaluate if there is an association between burnout syndrome and resilience in medical students, assessing covariates such as depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, and religiosity. This cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 209 students from a medical school in Brazil. Burnout syndrome was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Student Survey. Potential protective factors and aggravators to burnout syndrome were investigated using appropriate scales. Fifty-nine students (28.2%) presented burnout. Multivariate analysis showed that resilience was a protective factor (p < 0.001), along with being older, married or having better academic performance. Depressive symptoms were positively associated with burnout. Religiosity was not a protective factor and suicidal ideation was not associated with burnout when adjusted for depressive symptoms. Burnout is frequent among medical students, impacting mental health and academic performance. Resilience seems to be a protective factor, and the relationship between burnout and suicidal ideation is possibly mediated by depressive symptoms. Prospective studies are needed to further investigate the associations found in this study.

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