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Burnett Method with Absolute Pressure Transducer and Measurements for PVT Properties of Nitrogen and Hydrogen up to 473 K and 100 MPa

Authors
  • Sakoda, N.1
  • Shindo, K.2
  • Motomura, K.2
  • Shinzato, K.3
  • Kohno, M.2, 4
  • Takata, Y.2, 4
  • Fujii, M.3
  • 1 Kyushu University, International Research Center for Hydrogen Energy, Fukuoka, Japan , Fukuoka (Japan)
  • 2 Kyushu University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fukuoka, Japan , Fukuoka (Japan)
  • 3 National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage (HYDROGENIUS), Fukuoka, Japan , Fukuoka (Japan)
  • 4 Kyushu University, International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (I2CNER), Fukuoka, Japan , Fukuoka (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Thermophysics
Publisher
Springer US
Publication Date
Nov 10, 2011
Volume
33
Issue
1
Pages
6–21
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10765-011-1120-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

A measurement method for PVT properties of high-temperature and high-pressure gases was developed by simplifying the Burnett method and revising the data acquisition procedure. Instead of a differential pressure transducer, which is traditionally used, an absolute pressure transducer is used in the present method, and the measurement of pressure becomes easier. However, the absolute pressure transducer is placed outside the constant temperature bath because of the difficulty of its use in high-temperature surroundings, and some parts with different temperatures from the sample vessels exist as dead space. The present method takes into account the effect of the dead space in the data acquisition procedure. Nitrogen was measured in the temperature range from 353 K to 473 K and at pressures up to 100 MPa to determine the apparatus constants, and then, hydrogen was measured at 473 K and up to 100 MPa. The determined densities are in agreement within uncertainties of 0.07% to 0.24% (k = 2), both with the latest equation of state and existing measured data.

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