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Bringing Personalized Medicine to a PACT Program: A Quality Improvement Project.

Authors
  • Conley, Virginia M1
  • Daack-Hirsch, Sandra2
  • Halbmaier, Katie3
  • Shaw, Lisa4
  • 1 Virginia M. Conley, PhD, ARNP, FNP-BC, PMHNP-BC, FAANP, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA; Eyerly Ball Community Mental Health Services, Des Moines, IA, USA.
  • 2 Sandra Daack-Hirsch, PhD, RN, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
  • 3 Katie Halbmaier, DNP, ARNP, FNP-BC, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
  • 4 Lisa Shah, PhD, RN, University of Pittsburg, Pittsburg, PA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2020
Volume
26
Issue
1
Pages
77–85
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1078390319826687
PMID: 30688546
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Programs for assertive community treatment (PACT) serve persons with severe mental illness who have been unsuccessful with traditional outpatient services. Many PACT clients struggle to obtain symptom relief with medications that often have poor efficacy and undesired side effects, which can result in nonadherence, relapse, and increased health care utilization with associated costs. AIMS: This quality improvement project aimed to improve client and PACT program outcomes by incorporating pharmacogenomic testing into the psychopharmacological decision-making process. METHODS: The project used a pre-posttest design with each client serving as their own control to evaluate changes in clients' symptoms and program outcomes resulting from pharmacogenomics-guided medication management. RESULTS: Following project implementation, clients' symptoms were decreased and both engagement in care and stability in the community increased. Psychiatric hospitalizations and associated costs decreased. CONCLUSIONS: This project suggests utility for using pharmacogenomics testing to personalize care for persons with severe mental illness.

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