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Bridging Health Disparities: a Genomics and Transcriptomics Analysis by Race in Prostate Cancer.

Authors
  • Lee, Kristi Y1
  • Beatson, Erica L1
  • Steinberg, Seth M2
  • Chau, Cindy H1
  • Price, Douglas K1
  • Figg, William D3
  • 1 Molecular Pharmacology Section, Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. , (Mali)
  • 2 Biostatistics and Data Management Section, Office of the Clinical Director, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
  • 3 Molecular Pharmacology Section, Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. [email protected]. , (Mali)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2024
Volume
11
Issue
1
Pages
492–504
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s40615-023-01534-4
PMID: 36810713
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

As the era of cancer genomics expands, disproportionate rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality by race have demonstrated increasing relevance in clinical settings. While Black men are most particularly affected, as data has historically shown, the opposite is observed for Asian men, thus creating a basis for exploring genomic pathways potentially involved in mediating these opposing trends. Studies on racial differences are limited by sample size, but recent expanding collaborations between research institutions may improve these imbalances to enhance investigations on health disparities from the genomics front. In this study, we performed a race genomics analysis using GENIE v11, released in January 2022, to investigate mutation and copy number frequencies of select genes in both primary and metastatic patient tumor samples. Further, we investigate the TCGA race cohort to conduct an ancestry analysis and to identify differentially expressed genes highly upregulated in one race and subsequently downregulated in another. Our findings highlight pathway-oriented genetic mutation frequencies characterized by race, and further, we identify candidate gene transcripts that have differential expression between Black and Asian men. © 2023. This is a U.S. Government work and not under copyright protection in the US; foreign copyright protection may apply.

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