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Breathing frequency and pattern are poor predictors of work of breathing in patients receiving pressure support ventilation.

Authors
  • Banner, M J
  • Kirby, R R
  • Kirton, O C
  • DeHaven, C B
  • Blanch, P B
Type
Published Article
Journal
Chest
Publication Date
Nov 01, 1995
Volume
108
Issue
5
Pages
1338–1344
Identifiers
PMID: 7587438
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Our data reveal that WOB should be measured directly because variables of the breathing pattern commonly used at the bedside appear to be inaccurate and misleading inferences of the WOB. The clinical implication of these findings involves the traditional and empirical practice of titrating PSV based on the breathing pattern. We do not imply that the patient's breathing pattern should be ignored, nor undermine its importance, for it provides useful diagnostic information. It appears, however, that relying primarily on the breathing pattern alone does not provide enough information to accurately assess the respiratory muscle workload. Using the breathing pattern as the primary guideline for selecting a level of PSV may result in inappropriate respiratory muscle workloads. A more comprehensive strategy is to employ WOB measurements and the breathing pattern in a complementary manner when titrating PSV in critically ill patients.

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