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Breast tumors that overexpress nuclear metastasis-associated 1 (MTA1) protein have high recurrence risks but enhanced responses to systemic therapies.

Authors
  • 1
  • 1 Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Breast cancer research and treatment
Publication Date
Volume
95
Issue
1
Pages
7–12
Identifiers
PMID: 16244788
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Nuclear metastasis-associated 1(MTA1) protein is an estrogen receptor co-repressor that regulates transcription via chromatin remodeling, and MTA1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels are elevated in several kinds of locally advanced and metastatic tumors relative to non-metastatic tumors. Previous studies in our laboratory mapped MTA1 into a region showing significantly lower LOH (loss of heterozygosity) in primary breast cancers with metastases compared to node-negative tumors, suggesting that epigenetic alterations of MTA1 affect metastatic potential. The present study examined immunohistochemical expression of the MTA1 protein in treated and untreated primary human breast cancers to study the relationship between MTA1 expression and clinical outcome. Node-negative tumors that overexpress MTA1 protein had recurrence risks similar to node-positive tumors. In multivariate analysis of untreated node-negative tumors, highest expression of MTA1 was associated with increased relapse risk (hazard ratio (HR)=2.72, p=0.0003 for multivariate analysis). Tamoxifen and/or anthracylcene-based chemotherapies eliminated all MTA1 associations with clinical outcome, suggesting MTA1 overexpression predicts early disease relapse, but sensitizes breast tumors to systemic therapies.

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