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Brain norepinephrine depleting lesions selectively enhance behavioral responsiveness to novelty.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Physiology & Behavior
0031-9384
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
33
Issue
3
Pages
473–478
Identifiers
PMID: 6440160
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The noradrenergic innervation of the forebrain by cells from the locus coeruleus (LC) was interrupted by either electrolytic lesions of the LC or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle (DB). Animals so treated were then tested in a modified open field test designed to measure responsiveness to environmental novelty and also tested for food consumption in their home cages. In addition, DB lesioned animals were tested in photocell activity cages for both their initial locomotor response to the novel cages as well as their activity level after habituation. The DB lesioned animals were also tested for rates of acquisition and extinction of an operant response. The DB lesion produced no deficits in either the acquisition or the extinction of a food rewarded operant response. The DB lesion did reduce the initial amount of locomotor activity in response to introduction to the activity cages but did not alter the rate of habituation of the locomotor response nor the "basal" level of activity at the end of two hr of exposure. Neither lesion affected the amount of food eaten by 24 hr-fasted animals in their home cages during the first 15 min. When fasted prior to being given access to food in a novel open field, however, both lesions resulted in decreased food consumption and decreased amounts eaten per approach to the food pedestal. The DB lesion, but not the LC lesion, resulted in decreased rearing and grooming in this setting.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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