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Boys with fragile X syndrome: investigating temperament in early childhood.

Authors
  • Low Kapalu, C M1, 2
  • Gartstein, M A3
  • 1 Department of Pediatrics, University of Missouri Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA.
  • 2 Developmental and Behavioral Sciences, Children's Mercy Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, USA.
  • 3 Psychology Department, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of intellectual disability research : JIDR
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2016
Volume
60
Issue
9
Pages
891–900
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jir.12304
PMID: 27321588
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an x-linked genetic disorder that represents the most common hereditary cause of Intellectual Disability (ID). Very specific behavioural features (e.g. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and stereotyped behaviour) are associated with FXS in adolescents and adults, yet research on temperament and behavioural characteristics in young children with FXS has been more limited and less conclusive. This study investigated temperament differences in young boys (3-7 years old) with FXS (N = 26) recruited from a national FXS centre and controls (N = 26) matched on age, gender and race. Compared with controls, boys with FXS exhibited less overall surgency/extraversion and effortful control. Boys with FXS also displayed significantly greater activity and shyness and less attentional focusing, inhibitory control, soothability and high intensity pleasure (tendency to enjoy intense/complex activities), relative to comparison children. A significant interaction between age and diagnosis (FXS or control) was observed for negative affectivity only. Attention difficulties commonly found in adolescents and adults with FXS appear to also be characteristic of young boys with FXS, as reflected by lower effortful control. Age-related findings concerning negative affectivity may be particularly significant, leading to improved intervention/preventative efforts. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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