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Borrelia burgdorferi glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins: a potential target for new therapeutics against Lyme disease.

Authors
  • Lin, Yi-Pin1, 2
  • Li, Lingyun3
  • Zhang, Fuming4
  • Linhardt, Robert J5, 4, 6
  • 1 1 Division of Infectious Disease, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA.
  • 2 2 Department of Biomedical Science, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY, USA.
  • 3 3 Division of Environmental Health Science, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA.
  • 4 4 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
  • 5 5 Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
  • 6 6 Departments of Biology and Biomedical Engineering, Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Microbiology
Publisher
Microbiology Society
Publication Date
Nov 08, 2017
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1099/mic.0.000571
PMID: 29116038
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferisensu lato is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne disease in Europe and the United States. The spirochetes can be transmitted to humans via ticks, and then spread to different tissues, leading to arthritis, carditis and neuroborreliosis. Although antibiotics have commonly been used to treat infected individuals, some treated patients do not respond to antibiotics and experience persistent, long-term arthritis. Thus, there is a need to investigate alternative therapeutics against Lyme disease. The spirochete bacterium colonization is partly attributed to the binding of the bacterial outer-surface proteins to the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of host proteoglycans. Blocking the binding of these proteins to GAGs is a potential strategy to prevent infection. In this review, we have summarized the recent reports of B. burgdorferisensu lato GAG-binding proteins and discussed the potential use of synthetic and semi-synthetic compounds, including GAG analogues, to block pathogen interaction with GAGs. Such information should motivate the discovery and development of novel GAG analogues as new therapeutics for Lyme disease. New therapeutic approaches should eventually reduce the burden of Lyme disease and improve human health.

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