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Body Composition During Pregnancy: Longitudinal Changes and Method Comparisons.

Authors
  • Bosaeus, Marja1
  • Andersson-Hall, Ulrika2
  • Andersson, Louise1
  • Karlsson, Therese1
  • Ellegård, Lars3, 4
  • Holmäng, Agneta1
  • 1 Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 432, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 2 Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 432, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. [email protected] , (Sweden)
  • 3 Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 4 Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. , (Sweden)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Reproductive Sciences
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2020
Volume
27
Issue
7
Pages
1477–1489
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s43032-020-00141-6
PMID: 31993997
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The Pregnancy Obesity Nutrition and Child Health study is a longitudinal study of reproductive health. Here we analyzed body composition of normal-weight and obese Swedish women by three methods during each trimester of pregnancy. Cross-sectional and longitudinal fat mass estimates using quantitative magnetic resonance (QMR) and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) (Tanita MC-180MA-III) were compared with fat mass determined by air displacement plethysmography (ADP) in pregnancy weeks 8-12, 24-26, and 35-37 in normal-weight women (n = 122, BMI = 22.1 ± 1.6 kg/m2) and obese women (n = 29, BMI = 34.6 ± 3.6 kg/m2). ADP results were calculated from pregnancy-adjusted fat-free mass densities. Mean fat mass by QMR and ADP were similar in obese women, although with wide limits of agreement. In normal-weight women, QMR overestimated mean fat mass in all trimesters, with systematic overestimation at low fat mass values in trimesters 1 and 3. In obese women, fat mass by BIA was grossly underestimated and imprecise in all trimesters, especially at higher values in trimester 2. In normal-weight women, fat mass by BIA was moderately lower than by ADP in trimester 1, similar in trimester 2, and moderately higher in trimester 3. QMR and ADP assessed fat mass changes similarly in obese women, whereas BIA overestimated fat mass changes in normal-weight women. Mean fat mass and fat mass changes by QMR and pregnancy-adjusted ADP were similar in pregnant obese women. Mean fat mass by QMR and fat mass changes by BIA were higher than corresponding values determined by pregnancy-adjusted ADP in normal-weight women.

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