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Blood transfusion practices in dialysis patients in a dynamic regulatory environment.

Authors
  • Hirth, Richard A1
  • Turenne, Marc N2
  • Wilk, Adam S3
  • Wheeler, John R C3
  • Sleeman, Kathryn K4
  • Zhang, Wei3
  • Paul, Matthew A5
  • Nahra, Tammie A3
  • Messana, Joseph M6
  • 1 School of Public Health, Health Management & Policy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
  • 3 School of Public Health, Health Management & Policy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
  • 4 School of Public Health, Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
  • 5 Research & Data Analysis Division, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Olympia, WA.
  • 6 Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI.
Type
Published Article
Journal
American Journal of Kidney Diseases
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2014
Volume
64
Issue
4
Pages
616–621
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2014.01.011
PMID: 24560166
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Transfusion rates increased post-PPS, but these increases were modest in both absolute and relative terms. The largest increase occurred for patients already receiving several transfusions. Although these findings may reduce concerns regarding the impact of Medicare's PPS on inappropriate transfusions that impair access to kidney transplantation or stress blood bank resources, transfusions should continue to be monitored.

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