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Blood pressure is lowered by vitamin D (alphacalcidol) during long-term treatment of patients with intermittent hypercalcaemia. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

Authors
  • Lind, L
  • Wengle, B
  • Ljunghall, S
Type
Published Article
Journal
Acta medica Scandinavica
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1987
Volume
222
Issue
5
Pages
423–427
Identifiers
PMID: 3321926
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

There is epidemiologic evidence of a relationship between calcium deficiency and hypertension. The present study evaluated the effects of alphacalcidol, a synthetic analogue of active vitamin D, given to 29 patients with marginal, intermittent hypercalcaemia. Before therapy there was an inverse relationship between serum calcium levels and diastolic blood pressure (p less than 0.02). Treatment with 1 microgram alphacalcidol raised the serum calcium by 0.07 mmol/l during a 6-month, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and caused a significant reduction of diastolic blood pressure by 9.2 mmHg compared with placebo (p less than 0.01). The study extends previous observations, in normocalcaemic subjects, of inverse relationships between serum calcium and blood pressure indicating a primary disturbance of calcium homeostasis in hypertension. The observation that a physiologic amount of active vitamin D has hypotensive effects agrees with such a concept and suggests a new principle for the treatment of hypertension.

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