Affordable Access

Blood flow in the sciatic nerve is regulated by vasoconstrictive and vasodilative nerve fibers originating from the ventral and dorsal roots of the spinal nerves.

Authors
  • Sato, A
  • Sato, Y
  • Uchida, S
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuroscience research
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1994
Volume
21
Issue
2
Pages
125–133
Identifiers
PMID: 7724063
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Anesthetized rats were subjected to repetitive electrical stimulation of either the ventral or dorsal root of the spinal nerves between the 11th thoracic and 2nd sacral spinal segments. The response of nerve blood flow (NBF) in the sciatic nerve was examined using laser Doppler flowmetry. For all nerve fibers stimulation was for a 10-30-s period at a supramaximal intensity. (1) Stimulation of the T11-L1 ventral roots produced an increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and a biphasic NBF response was comprised of an initial increase and a subsequent decrease. The initial increase was a passive vasodilation due to the increase in MAP, while the following decrease in NBF resulted from active vasoconstriction of the vasa nervorum due to the activation of sympathetic nerves innervating the sciatic vasa nervorum. (2) Stimulation of the ventral root of the L6 segment produced an increase in NBF, even though MAP decreased. This increase in NBF was apparently mediated by activation of parasympathetic cholinergic vasodilators, because the response was abolished by i.v. injection of atropine, a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist. (3) Stimulation of the dorsal roots between the L3 and S1 segments produced an increase in NBF, independent of changes in MAP. This increase in NBF appeared to be mediated by activation of a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) containing afferent fibers innervating the vasa nervorum, because the response was abolished by topical application of hCGRP (8-37), a CGRP receptor antagonist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times