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Blending with transition metals improves bioresorbable zinc as better medical implants.

Authors
  • Su, Yingchao1
  • Fu, Jiayin2, 3
  • Zhou, Juncen1
  • Georgas, Elias1
  • Du, Shaokang4
  • Qin, Yi-Xian1
  • Wang, Yadong2
  • Zheng, Yufeng5
  • Zhu, Donghui1
  • 1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA.
  • 2 Nancy E. and Peter C. Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
  • 3 Department of Cardiology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China. , (China)
  • 4 Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing, China. , (China)
  • 5 School of Materials Science and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Bioactive Materials
Publisher
KeAi Publishing
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2023
Volume
20
Pages
243–258
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.bioactmat.2022.05.033
PMID: 35702610
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Zinc (Zn) is a new class of bioresorbable metal that has potential for cardiovascular stent material, orthopedic implants, wound closure devices, etc. However, pure Zn is not ideal for these applications due to its low mechanical strength and localized degradation behavior. Alloying is the most common/effective way to overcome this limitation. Still, the choice of alloying element is crucial to ensure the resulting alloy possesses sufficient mechanical strength, suitable degradation rate, and acceptable biocompatibility. Hereby, we proposed to blend selective transition metals (i.e., vanadium-V, chromium-Cr, and zirconium-Zr) to improve Zn's properties. These selected transition metals have similar properties to Zn and thus are beneficial for the metallurgy process and mechanical property. Furthermore, the biosafety of these elements is of less concern as they all have been used as regulatory approved medical implants or a component of an implant such as Ti6Al4V, CoCr, or Zr-based dental implants. Our study showed the first evidence that blending with transition metals V, Cr, or Zr can improve Zn's properties as bioresorbable medical implants. In addition, three in vivo implantation models were explored in rats: subcutaneous, aorta, and femoral implantations, to target the potential clinical applications of bioresorbable Zn implants. © 2022 The Authors.

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