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Birthweight, lifetime obesity and physical functioning in mid-adulthood: a nationwide birth cohort study.

Authors
  • Rogers, Nina Trivedy1, 2
  • Power, Chris3
  • Pinto Pereira, Snehal M1, 2
  • 1 MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing, UCL, London, UK.
  • 2 UCL Research Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, London, UK.
  • 3 Population, Policy and Practice, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Epidemiology
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2020
Volume
49
Issue
2
Pages
657–665
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyz120
PMID: 31218351
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Evidence is scant on long-term implications of childhood obesity and body mass index (BMI) gains over the life-course for poor physical functioning (PF). The objective was to establish whether (i) birthweight and BMI across the life-course, (ii) BMI gains at specific life-stages and (iii) age of obesity onset were associated with PF at 50 y. In the 1958 British birth cohort (n = 8674), BMI (kg/m2) was calculated using height and weight [measured (7, 11, 16, 33 and 45 y); self-reported (23 and 50 y)]. PF was assessed at 50 y using the validated PF subscale of the Short-form 36 survey; the bottom (gender-specific) 10% was classified as poor PF. Missing data were imputed via multiple imputation. Associations were examined using logistic regression, adjusting for health and social factors. Birthweight was not associated with PF. At each adult age, odds of poor PF were highest for obese (vs normal), e.g. for 23 y obesity the odds ratio (OR)adjusted for poor PF was 2.28 (1.34, 3.91) and 2.67 (1.72, 4.14) in males and females respectively. BMI gains were associated with poor PF, e.g. for females, ORadjusted per standard deviation (SD) in BMI gain 16-23 y was 1.28 (1.13, 1.46); for BMI gains 45-50 y it was 1.36 (1.11, 1.65). Longer duration of obesity was associated with poor PF, e.g. in males, ORadjusted was 2.32 (1.26, 4.29) for childhood obesity onset and 1.50 (1.16, 1.96) for mid-adulthood onset (vs never obese, P-trend < 0.001). Obesity, BMI gains, and earlier obesity onset were associated with poor PF in mid-adulthood, reinforcing the importance of preventing and delaying obesity onset. © The Author(s) 2019; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

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