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Biological interactions between nanomaterials and placental development and function following oral exposure.

Authors
  • Mortensen, Ninell P1
  • Johnson, Leah M2
  • Grieger, Khara D3
  • Ambroso, Jeffrey L4
  • Fennell, Timothy R5
  • 1 Discovery Sciences, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Rd, RTP, NC, 27709, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Engineered Systems, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Rd, RTP, NC, 27709, USA.
  • 3 Health and Environmental Risk Analysis Program, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Rd, RTP, NC, 27709, USA; Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University, 1070 Partners Way, Raleigh, NC, 27695, USA.
  • 4 Center for Global Health, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Rd, RTP, NC, 27709, USA.
  • 5 Discovery Sciences, RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Rd, RTP, NC, 27709, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Reproductive toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.)
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2019
Volume
90
Pages
150–165
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2019.08.016
PMID: 31476381
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

We summarize the literature involving the deposition of nanomaterials within the placenta following oral exposure and the biological interactions between nanomaterials and placental development and function. The review focuses on the oral exposure of metal and metal oxide engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), carbon-based ENMs, and nanoplastics in animal models, with a minor discussion of intravenous injections. Although the literature suggests that the placenta is an efficient barrier in preventing nanomaterials from reaching the fetus, nanomaterials that accumulate in the placenta may interfere with its development and function. Furthermore, some studies have demonstrated a decrease in placental weight and association with adverse fetal health outcomes following oral exposure to nanomaterials. Since nanomaterials are increasingly used in food, food packaging, and have been discovered in drinking water, the risk for adverse impacts on placental development and functions, with secondary effects on embryo-fetal development, following unintentional maternal ingestion of nanomaterials requires further investigation. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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