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Biofilm's Role in Chronic Cholesteatomatous Otitis Media: A Pilot Study.

Authors
  • Galli, Jacopo1
  • Calò, Lea2
  • Giuliani, Monica1
  • Sergi, Bruno1
  • Lucidi, Daniela1
  • Meucci, Duino1
  • Bassotti, Ezio3
  • Sanguinetti, Maurizio4
  • Paludetti, Gaetano1
  • 1 Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Otorhinolaryngology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart School of Medicine and Surgery, Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 2 Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Institute of Otorhinolaryngology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart School of Medicine and Surgery, Rome, Italy [email protected] , (Italy)
  • 3 Institute of Odontostomatology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart School of Medicine and Surgery, Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 4 Department of Diagnostic and Laboratory Medicine, Institute of Microbiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart School of Medicine and Surgery, Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Otolaryngology
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Publication Date
May 01, 2016
Volume
154
Issue
5
Pages
914–916
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/0194599816630548
PMID: 26932953
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cholesteatoma is a destructive lesion involving the temporal bone, which may induce severe complications due to its expansion and erosion of adjacent structures. Bacterial biofilm plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of many otolaryngologic inflammatory/infectious chronic diseases. In this pilot study, we investigated, by means of cultural examination and with scanning electron microscope, the presence of bacterial biofilm in a series of samples from the epitympanic and mastoid region in patients affected by cholesteatoma and from the promontory region in patients with healthy mucosa who were undergoing to stapes surgery. The preliminary data support the association between biofilm and cholesteatoma (81.3% of the cases) and allow us to hypothesize that keratinized matrix of cholesteatoma may represent the ideal substrate for biofilm colonization and survival; this finding is consistent with the clinical course of aural cholesteatoma, characterized by recurrent exacerbations and recalcitrant course.

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