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Biodegradation mechanisms of sulfonamides by Phanerochaete chrysosporium - Luffa fiber system revealed at the transcriptome level.

Authors
  • Zhang, Lan1
  • Johnson, Nicholas W2
  • Liu, Yun3
  • Miao, Yu4
  • Chen, Ruihuan5
  • Chen, Hong6
  • Jiang, Qian7
  • Li, Zhongpei8
  • Dong, Yuanhua9
  • Mahendra, Shaily10
  • 1 CAS Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100000, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 2 Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 3 CAS Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008, China; National Engineering Laboratory for Site Remediation Technologies, Beijing, 100015, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100000, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 4 Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 5 CAS Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100000, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 6 CAS Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100000, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 7 CAS Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100000, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 8 CAS Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100000, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 9 CAS Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100000, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 10 Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Chemosphere
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2021
Volume
266
Pages
129194–129194
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2020.129194
PMID: 33316476
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The overuse of antibiotics and subsequent enrichment of antibiotic resistant microbes in the natural and built environments is a severe threat to global public health. In this study, a Phanerochaete chrysosporium fungal-luffa fiber system was found to efficiently biodegrade two sulfonamides, sulfadimethoxine (SDM) and sulfadizine (SDZ), in cow urine wastewater. Biodegradation pathways were proposed on the basis of key metabolites identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QqTOF-MS). Transcriptomic, metabolomic, and free radical analyses were performed to explore the functional groups and detailed molecular mechanisms of SDM and SDZ degradation. A total of 27 UniGene clusters showed significant differences between luffa fiber and luffa fiber-free systems, which were significantly correlated to cellulose catabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and oxidoreductase activity. Carbohydrate-active enzymes and oxidoreductases appear to play particularly important roles in SDM and SDZ degradation. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy revealed the generation and evolution of OH and R during the biodegradation of SDM and SDZ, suggesting that beyond enzymatic degradation, SDM and SDZ were also transformed through a free radical pathway. Luffa fiber also acts as a co-substrate to improve the activity of enzymes for the degradation of SDM and SDZ. This research provides a potential strategy for removing SDM and SDZ from agricultural and industrial wastewater using fungal-luffa fiber systems. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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