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Sex Differences in Becoming a Current Electronic Cigarette User, Current Smoker and Current Dual User of Both Products: A Longitudinal Study among Mexican Adolescents.

Authors
  • Rodríguez-Bolaños, Rosibel1
  • Arillo-Santillán, Edna1, 2
  • Barrientos-Gutiérrez, Inti3
  • Zavala-Arciniega, Luis4
  • Ntansah, Charity A5
  • Thrasher, James F1, 5
  • 1 Population Health Research Center, Mexican National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655 Col. Santa María Ahuacatitlán, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62100, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 2 School of Demography, Australian National University, Canberra 2601, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Center for Evaluation and Survey Research, Mexican National Institute of Public Health, Av. Universidad 655 Col. Santa María Ahuacatitlán, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62100, Mexico. , (Mexico)
  • 4 Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
  • 5 Department of Health Promotion, Education & Behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Dec 27, 2019
Volume
17
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph17010196
PMID: 31892159
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study aimed to assess sex differences in predictors for becoming a current exclusive electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) user, current exclusive smoker, or current dual user (concurrent smoking and e-cigarette use). This longitudinal study included 2399 females and 2177 males who had tried neither cigarettes nor e-cigarettes at baseline and attended 57 middle schools in the three largest cities in Mexico. We estimated multinomial logistic models stratified by sex. At follow-up, the prevalence of current exclusive e-cigarette use was 6.4% for males and 5.5% for females; current exclusive smoking was similar among males (3.6%) and females (3.5%); dual use was 2.4% females and 1.8% males. In the adjusted model, current e-cigarette use among females was associated with baseline current drinking (ARR = 1.85; p < 0.05), having a job (ARR = 1.99; p < 0.05), higher technophilia (ARR = 1.27; p < 0.05), and higher positive smoking expectancies (ARR = 1.39; p < 0.05). Among males, only having friends who smoke cigarettes at baseline was a significant predictor of current exclusive e-cigarette use at follow-up (ARR = 1.44; p < 0.05). For both sexes, current exclusive smoking at follow-up was associated with baseline current drinking (male ARR = 2.56; p < 0.05; female ARR = 2.31; p < 0.05) and, among males, only with having a parent who smoked (ARR = 1.64; p < 0.05). For both sexes, dual use at follow-up was associated with baseline current drinking (male ARR = 3.52; p < 0.005; female ARR = 2.77; p < 0.05); among females, with having paid work (ARR = 2.50; p < 0.001); and among males, with parental smoking (ARR = 3.20; p < 0.05). Results suggested both common and different risk factors by sex, suggesting that interventions may need to consider targeting sex differences.

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