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Compression Stocking Length Effects on Oedema, Pain, and Satisfaction in Nursing Students: A Pilot Randomized Trial.

Authors
  • Lee, Yoonyoung1
  • Kim, Kisook2
  • Kang, Seunghyun3
  • Kim, Ji Yeong4
  • Kim, Su Gyeong1
  • Kim, Taeun5
  • Jung, Jisu6
  • 1 Department of Nursing, Sunchon National University, Suncheon, Jeollanam-do 57922, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 Department of Nursing, Korea University Ansan Medicine, Ansan, Geyonggi-do 15355, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 4 Department of Nursing, Kyunghee University Medical Center, Seoul 02447, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 5 Army Nurse, Korea Army, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 6 Department of Nursing, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505, Korea. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Healthcare (Basel, Switzerland)
Publication Date
May 29, 2020
Volume
8
Issue
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/healthcare8020149
PMID: 32486025
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Professional practitioners who are required to stand for long periods of time frequently complain about vein-related symptoms. Compression stocking are effective for vein-related symptoms, but there is not enough evidence on the effect of the length of compression stockings for nursing students. To compare oedema, pain, and satisfaction according to different lengths of compression stockings worn by female nursing students. This study was conducted as a randomized clinical trial. The participants included 20 female nursing students in their first semester of clinical practice training. Compression stockings with 25-32 mmHg pressure were used in the study; the participants were divided into two groups based on the length of compression stocking: knee length and thigh length. Differences between groups regarding pain, oedema, and satisfaction were analysed using t-tests, paired t-tests, and Mann-Whitney U tests, when appropriate. There were no significant differences in pain, oedema, and satisfaction between the two groups. However, pain in right legs of the thigh-length stocking group significantly increased after clinical training shift compared with that before the shift (t = -2.377, p = 0.041). Both groups reported high satisfaction. There were no differences in pain, oedema, and satisfaction in both legs based on the length of compression stockings, but side effects appeared in participants wearing the thigh-length stockings; nevertheless, satisfaction was high in both groups. It may be important to suggest nursing students to wear knee-length compression stockings during clinical practice training.

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