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The Bidirectional Relationship Between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Chronic Kidney Disease.

Authors
  • Hui, Lily1
  • Benca, Ruth2
  • 1 University of California Irvine Medical Center, Medicine, 40 Palatine, Irvine, CA 92868, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
  • 2 University of California, Irvine, 101 The City Drive South, Bldg 3, Rt. 88, Irvine, CA 92697, United States. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases : the official journal of National Stroke Association
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2021
Volume
30
Issue
9
Pages
105652–105652
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2021.105652
PMID: 33608118
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Sleep apnea is a condition with significant health risks and increased risk of mortality and is prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease. This paper describes the detrimental cardiovascular sequelae of sleep-disordered breathing and explores the bidirectional relationship between chronic kidney disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea-related hypoxia produces a range of harmful systemic effects including oxidative stress, inflammation, and sympathetic activation that collectively worsen the progression of renal disease. In turn, chronic kidney disease can result in increased severity of sleep apnea through inducing (1) uremic neuropathy and myopathy, (2) altered chemosensitivity, and (3) hypervolemia. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy remains the mainstay of treatment for reversing the health risks of apnea. Other strategies aimed at decreasing the high prevalence and associated morbidity of sleep apnea include weight loss, oral appliances, and corrective surgery in the case of airway obstruction. Published by Elsevier Inc.

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