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Bidirectional Brain-gut-microbiota Axis in increased intestinal permeability induced by central nervous system injury.

Authors
  • Li, Xiao-Jin1
  • You, Xin-Yu1
  • Wang, Cong-Ying1
  • Li, Xue-Li1
  • Sheng, Yuan-Yuan1
  • Zhuang, Peng-Wei1, 2
  • Zhang, Yan-Jun1, 2
  • 1 Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China. , (China)
  • 2 Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine Pharmacology, Tianjin, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2020
Volume
26
Issue
8
Pages
783–790
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/cns.13401
PMID: 32472633
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Central nervous system injuries may lead to the disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic nervous system, and enteric nervous system. These effects then cause the changes in the intestinal microenvironment, such as a disordered intestinal immune system as well as alterations of intestinal bacteria. Ultimately, this leads to an increase in intestinal permeability. Inflammatory factors produced by the interactions between intestinal neurons and immune cells as well as the secretions and metabolites of intestinal flora can then migrate through the intestinal barrier, which will aggravate any peripheral inflammation and the central nervous system injury. The brain-gut-microbiota axis is a complex system that plays a crucial role in the occurrence and development of central nervous system diseases. It may also increase the consequences of preventative treatment. In this context, here we have summarized the factors that can lead to the increased intestinal permeability and some of the possible outcomes. © 2020 The Authors. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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