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The behavioral paradigm to induce repeated social defeats in zebrafish.

Authors
  • Nakajo, Haruna1
  • Tsuboi, Takashi2
  • Okamoto, Hitoshi3
  • 1 Laboratory for Neural Circuit Dynamics of Decision Making, RIKEN Center for Brain Science, Saitama 351-0198, Japan; Department of Life Sciences, Graduate school of arts and science, The university of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 2 Department of Life Sciences, Graduate school of arts and science, The university of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan. , (Japan)
  • 3 Laboratory for Neural Circuit Dynamics of Decision Making, RIKEN Center for Brain Science, Saitama 351-0198, Japan; Department of Life Sciences, Graduate school of arts and science, The university of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Japan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Neuroscience research
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2020
Volume
161
Pages
24–32
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.neures.2019.11.004
PMID: 31711781
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Social subordination, which causes severe stress in animals, can affect animal's behaviors, homeostasis, and mental health. In rodents, experiences of repeated social defeats, but not a single defeat, induce a depression-like state. However, it is unclear whether such experiences similarly affect behaviors of other model animals than rodents. Here, we established a behavioral paradigm for repeated social defeats with zebrafish, an emerging model for behavioral neuroscience and pharmacological analysis. We put fish into repeated social subordination for 6 consecutive days. Using behaviors during fighting as indicators, we observed that experiencing repeated social defeats led to a reduction in fight frequency and duration. The continuously-defeated zebrafish failed to win even against the transgenic fish with an impaired winning-associated neural pathway. These results suggest that repeated social defeats led to demotivation to fight and to win against opponents. Moreover, they showed strong activity in the ventral habenula, an evolutionary homolog of the mammalian lateral habenula. However, unlike the mice model, the continuously-defeated zebrafish showed no change in anxiety level and sociability. Our established behavioral paradigm will be a new tool to investigate neural mechanisms underlying social defeats. Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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