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Behavior in dogs with spontaneous hypothyroidism during treatment with levothyroxine.

Authors
  • Hrovat, Alenka1
  • De Keuster, Tiny1
  • Kooistra, Hans S2
  • Duchateau, Luc3
  • Oyama, Mark A4
  • Peremans, Kathelijne5
  • Daminet, Sylvie1
  • 1 Small Animal Department, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 2 Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 3 Biometrics Research Group, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. , (Belgium)
  • 4 Department of Clinical Studies-Philadelphia, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • 5 Department of Veterinary Medical Imaging and Small Animal Orthopedics, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium. , (Belgium)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of veterinary internal medicine
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2019
Volume
33
Issue
1
Pages
64–71
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/jvim.15342
PMID: 30499213
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Thyroid hormone supplementation anecdotally has been described as a valid treatment option for dogs with aggression-related problems. However, prospective, controlled, and blinded trials evaluating behavior and neurohormonal status in hypothyroid dogs during treatment with levothyroxine are lacking. Levothyroxine supplementation will have a significant influence on the behavior and neurohormonal status of dogs with spontaneous hypothyroidism. Twenty client-owned dogs diagnosed with spontaneous hypothyroidism. This prospective study was to evaluate the behavior of dogs, which was screened at initial presentation, and after 6 weeks, and 6 months of treatment with levothyroxine (starting dosage 10 μg/kg PO q12h) using the standardized Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ). At each time period, circulating serotonin and prolactin (PRL) concentrations were evaluated using a commercially validated ELISA kit and heterologous radioimmunoassay, respectively. After 6 weeks of thyroid hormone supplementation, C-BARQ scores demonstrated a significant increase in activity of hypothyroid dogs (P < .01). No significant change in any of the behavioral signs was observed after 6 months of treatment. No significant difference in circulating concentrations of serotonin (P > .99 and P = .46) and PRL (P = .99 and P = .37) were noted between the 6-week and 6-month periods compared with baseline. The results of this study indicate increased activity of hypothyroid dogs after 6 weeks of thyroid hormone supplementation. None of the hypothyroid dogs in this cohort showed a significant change in any of the evaluated behavioral signs and neurohormonal status after 6 months of thyroid hormone supplementation. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

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