Affordable Access

Correction: Global and regional estimates of cancer mortality and incidence by site: II. results for the global burden of disease 2000

Authors
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Source
PMC
Keywords
  • Correction
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

1471-2407-3-20.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Cancer Open AcceCorrection Correction: Global and regional estimates of cancer mortality and incidence by site: II. results for the global burden of disease 2000 Kenji Shibuya*1, Colin D Mathers1, Cynthia Boschi-Pinto2, Alan D Lopez3 and Christopher JL Murray4 Address: 1Global Program on Evidence for Health Policy, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2Family and Community Health/ Child and Adolescent Health and Development, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, 3School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Herston, Australia and 4Executive Director, Evidence and Information for Policy, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland Email: Kenji Shibuya* - [email protected]; Colin D Mathers - [email protected]; Cynthia Boschi-Pinto - [email protected]; Alan D Lopez - [email protected]; Christopher JL Murray - [email protected] * Corresponding author After the publication of this work [1], we noticed the typo- graphical errors in Tables 8, 9, 16, and 17: there were inconsistencies between the ranking of cancer mortality and incidence and their corresponding figures. Here we briefly present the results along with the revisions of the relevant tables since the ranking was corrected while the figures remained the same as the original. Tables 1 and 2 represent the ranking of the number of deaths by cancer site in the world and three selected sub regions: African Region with a high child and adult mor- tality (AfrE), European Region with a very low child and adult mortality (EurA), and South East Asia Region with a low child and adult mortality (SearB). Lung cancer was the leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, account- ing for 17% of total cancer mortality, followed by cancers of stomach (12% of total), colon and rectum (9%), liver (9%), and breast (7%). In males, lung, stomach, and liver cancers were the three most common causes of cancer deaths. The leading cause of cancer deaths among females was

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.