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How long does it take to coil an intracranial aneurysm?

Publication Date
DOI: 10.1007/s00234-007-0301-6
  • Interventional Neuroradiology
  • Medicine


Introduction The change in the treatment of choice for intracranial aneurysms from clipping to coiling has been associated with an important change in logistics. The time needed for coiling is variable and depends on many factors. In this study, we assessed the procedural time for the coiling of 642 aneurysms and tried to identify predictors of a long procedural time. Methods The procedural time for coiling was defined as the number of minutes between the first diagnostic angiographic run and the last angiographic run after embolization. Thus, induction of general anesthesia and catheterization of the first vessel were not included in the procedural time. A long procedural time was defined as the upper quartile of procedural times (70–158 min). Logistic regression analysis was performed for several variables. Results The mean procedural time was 57.3 min (median 52 min, range 15–158 min). More than half of the coiling procedures lasted between 30 and 60 min. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified the use of a supportive device (OR 5.4), procedural morbidity (OR 4.5) and large aneurysm size (OR 3.0) as independent predictors of a long procedural time. A poor clinical condition of the patient, the rupture status of the aneurysm, gender, the occurrence of procedural rupture, and aneurysm location were not related to a long procedural time. The mean time for the first 321 coiling procedures was not statistically significantly different from mean time for the last 321 procedures. Conclusion With optimal logistics, coiling of most intracranial aneurysms can be performed in one to two hours, including patient handling before and after the actual coiling procedure.

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