Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Identifying important food sources of nutrients

Authors
Journal
Journal of Nutrition Education
0022-3182
Publisher
Elsevier
Volume
16
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/s0022-3182(84)80096-5
Disciplines
  • Design

Abstract

Abstract We used food intake records from 37,785 participants in the Nationwide Food Consumption Survey, 1977–78, to identify foods that are important sources of nine nutrients. The nutrients included: calcium, iron, magnesium, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and vitamin C. We designated foods that contributed a significant amount (at least 5 percent) to the total intake of a nutrient “important” sources of the nutrient. We considered a food a “good” source of a nutrient on the basis of the amount of the nutrient in a given quantity of the food. Some foods not normally included in lists of “good” nutrient sources, such as breads and rolls, were identified as “important” sources because the survey indicated that they were used frequently and in relatively large amounts. For some population subgroups, “important” sources of nutrients may differ from those reported in this study.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.