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Antiepileptic drugs in pregnancy

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PMC
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Abstract

Scan for mobile link. Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain What is Functional MR Imaging (fMRI) - Brain? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a relatively new procedure that uses MR imaging to measure the tiny metabolic changes that take place in an active part of the brain. What are some common uses of the procedure? fMRI is becoming the diagnostic method of choice for learning how a normal, diseased or injured brain is working, as well as for assessing the potential risks of surgery or other invasive treatments of the brain. Physicians perform fMRI to: examine the anatomy of the brain. determine precisely which part of the brain is handling critical functions such as thought, speech, movement and sensation, which is called brain mapping. help assess the effects of stroke, trauma or degenerative disease (such as Alzheimer's) on brain function. monitor the growth and function of brain tumors. guide the planning of surgery, radiation therapy, or other surgical treatments for the brain. How should I prepare? You may be asked to wear a gown during the exam or you may be allowed to wear your own clothing if Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Page 1 of 7 Copyright© 2013, RadiologyInfo.org Reviewed Mar-11-2013 it is loose-fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and also with the facility. Unle

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