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A Bayesian model comparison approach to test the specificity of visual integration impairment in schizophrenia or psychosis.

Authors
  • Grove, Tyler B1
  • Yao, Beier2
  • Mueller, Savanna A3
  • McLaughlin, Merranda4
  • Ellingrod, Vicki L5
  • McInnis, Melvin G4
  • Taylor, Stephan F6
  • Deldin, Patricia J6
  • Tso, Ivy F6
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA.
  • 3 Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
  • 4 Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
  • 5 Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
  • 6 Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Psychiatry research
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2018
Volume
265
Pages
271–278
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.04.061
PMID: 29768190
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Impaired visual integration is well documented in schizophrenia and related to functional outcomes. However, it is unclear if this deficit is specific to schizophrenia, or characteristic of psychosis more broadly. To address this question, this study used a Bayesian model comparison approach to examine the evidence of three grouping models of visual integration performance in 116 individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective disorder (SA), bipolar disorder (BD) with or without a history of prominent psychosis (BDP+ and BDP-, respectively), or no psychiatric diagnosis (healthy controls; HC). We compared: (1) Psychosis Model (psychosis, non-psychosis), where the psychosis group included SZ, SA, and BDP+, and the non-psychosis group included BDP- and HC; (2) Schizophrenia Model (SZ, non-SZ); and (3) DSM Model (SZ, SA, BD, HC). The relationship between visual integration and general cognition was also explored. The Psychosis Model showed the strongest evidence, and visual integration was associated with general cognition in participants with psychosis. The results were consistent with the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework, indicating that visual integration impairment is characteristic of psychosis and not specific to SZ or DSM categories, and may share similar disease pathways with observed neurocognitive deficits in psychotic disorders.

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