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[Basic principles and justification of drug policy].

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband der Ärzte des Öffentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany))
Publication Date
Volume
61
Issue
10
Pages
455–463
Identifiers
PMID: 10593048
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

In the international context drug policy is defined as a prohibitive control regime equipped with government functions. A possible extension has led to conflicts within the member states of the international drug control, resulting in two opposite positions: (1) A prohibitive line adhering to a ban of narcotic drugs, applying prosecution not only against dealers but also consumers and organizing help for drug addicts only to end drug abuse and not for any controlled consumption; (2) a permissive line aiming at a more or less controlled liberation of the use of narcotic drugs, limiting prosecution at the most to organized drug dealing, generally attempting to "decriminalize" the consumption, and finally to define heroine as a possible legal help for drug-addicts. The conflict concerning a new definition of national politics on drugs finds most public attention in Switzerland, where the government (Bundesrat) tries to follow a middle-of-the-road policy. Present German policy of the leftist federal government favors the Swiss paradigm; but Federal states like Bavaria under a conservative government still oppose this attitude.

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