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Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS): Validation in a Large Multisite College Sample.

Authors
  • Kamradt, Jaclyn M1
  • Nikolas, Molly A1
  • Burns, G Leonard2
  • Garner, Annie A3
  • Jarrett, Matthew A4
  • Luebbe, Aaron M5
  • Becker, Stephen P6, 7
  • 1 University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
  • 2 Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA.
  • 3 St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA.
  • 4 University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, USA.
  • 5 Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA.
  • 6 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
  • 7 University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Assessment
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
28
Issue
3
Pages
964–976
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1073191119869823
PMID: 31431045
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Despite the importance of daily life executive functioning (EF) for college students' success, few measures exist that have been validated in college students specifically. This study examined the factor structure of the Barkley Deficits in Executive Functioning Scale (BDEFS) in college students. Participants were 1,311 students (ages 18-28 years, 65% female) from five universities in the United States. Additionally, the study examined invariance across sex, age, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms. Exploratory structural equation modeling provided strong support for the BDEFS five-factor structure though some items had high cross-loadings on multiple factors. Findings generally supported invariance across sex and age; however, loadings, thresholds, and factor means differed based on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms. Stronger support for invariance across sex emerged for a reduced item version that eliminated cross-loading items. Overall, findings provide support for the validity and utility of the BDEFS in college students.

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