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BamA is a pivotal protein in cell envelope synthesis and cell division in Deinococcus radiodurans.

Authors
  • Yu, Jiangliu1
  • Lu, Luchun2
  • 1 College of Life Science, Anhui Agricultural University, 130 Changjiangxilu, Hefei 230036, PR China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 2 College of Life Science, Anhui Agricultural University, 130 Changjiangxilu, Hefei 230036, PR China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochimica et biophysica acta. Biomembranes
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2019
Volume
1861
Issue
7
Pages
1365–1374
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbamem.2019.05.010
PMID: 31103441
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The beta-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) is an indispensable complex for protein transportation located at the outer membrane of bacteria. BAM is composed of five subunits (BamA-E) in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. DR_0379 is a BamA homolog in Deinococcus radiodurans, but the other subunits have not been detected in this species. In the present study, deletion of bamA resulted in decreased growth rate and altered morphology of D. radiodurans. ΔbamA cells underwent abnormal cell division, leading to aggregated bacteria of diverse size and shape, and the cell envelope was detached from the cell surface, resulting in reduced resistance to high ionic strength. Oxidative stress resistance was significantly enhanced in the mutant, which may be attributed to increased manganese ion concentration and Mn/Fe ratio. Numerous proteins were released into the medium from ΔbamA cells, including surface layer (S-layer) proteins and various transporters located in the periplasm and outer membrane. These results indicate that BamA affects the synthesis and assembly of the outer membrane and S-layer, and thereby influences material transport and cell division. The findings highlight the special functions of BamA in D. radiodurans, and promote our understanding of the multi-layer structure of the D. radiodurans cell envelope. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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