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Impact of motivational interviewing-based training in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment on residents’ self-reported attitudes and behaviors

Authors
Journal
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
1940-0632
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1940-0640-8-s1-a71
Keywords
  • Meeting Abstract
Disciplines
  • Medicine

Abstract

Impact of motivational interviewing-based training in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment on residents’ self-reported attitudes and behaviors MEETING ABSTRACT Open Access Impact of motivational interviewing-based training in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment on residents’ self-reported attitudes and behaviors J Paul Seale1,2*, Denice C Clark2, Jason Dhabliwala2, David Miller3, Hunter Woodall4, Sylvia Shellenberger1,2, J Aaron Johnson1,2 From International Network on Brief Interventions for Alcohol and Other Drugs (INEBRIA) Meeting 2013 Rome, Italy. 18-20 September 2013 Introduction Many medical residents now receive training in screen- ing, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for alcohol and drugs. Clinician attitudes have been shown to impact SBIRT-related behaviors. Little research has explored the impact of SBIRT training on clinicians’ attitudes. Objective To determine whether SBIRT training impacts resident physicians’ alcohol-related attitudes and self-reported SBIRT activities. Methods Residents participating in SBIRT training in 4 U.S. primary care residency programs were surveyed during Months 0, 12, and 24. Interventions included training faculty site coordinators, providing residents 6 hours of motivational interviewing (MI)-based SBIRT curriculum per year, and implementing SBI protocols in residency clinics. Impact was assessed using the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (SAAPPQ) and residents’ self-reported frequency of alcohol screening, brief interventions (BIs) and use of specific BI components. Analyses assessed changes over time in SAAPPQ total and subscale scores, changes in BI performance and use of BI components, and the relationship between attitude scores and frequency of performing BIs and specific BI components. Results Residents’ scores on the role adequacy subscale of the SAAPPQ increased significantly between baseline and 12 month survey (p<.001). This incre

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