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Remedial education for black children in rural South Africa : an exploration of success using evolutionary innovation theory

Authors
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Technische Universiteit Eindhoven
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Disciplines
  • Education

Abstract

A Novel Approach to Innovation Processes in Community Driven Projects: How an extended Learning Selection model explains the success of SEIDET, an educational community development project in rural South Africa Remedial Education for Black Children in Rural South Africa: An Exploration of Success Using Evolutionary Innovation Theory T. Siebeling & H.A. Romijn Eindhoven Centre for Innovation Studies, The Netherlands Working Paper 05.10 Department of Technology Management Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, The Netherlands July 2005 Remedial Education for Black Children in Rural South Africa: An Exploration of Success Using Evolutionary Innovation Theory Tom Siebeling en Henny Romijn June 2005 1 1. Introduction The Siyabuswa Educational Improvement & Development Trust (SEIDET) is a community- initiated and -based remedial education project for black secondary school children in Siyabuswa, a rural town about 130 km North-East of Pretoria, South Africa. The project was started in 1992 as a response to the poor state of the Bantu education system in the region. During the apartheid period, many secondary school teachers had received little or no training to teach exact sciences. Because of this situation, very few black students managed to enroll in – let alone graduate from – universities and Technikons (polytechnics), especially in the science fields. SEIDET was initiated in order to alleviate this state of affairs. The purpose of this paper is to assess SEIDET's achievements in the first 10 years of its existence, and to explore the main factors that drove its attainments. There is no doubt that the project has indeed become very successful. The response from the entire community to the project from its inception has been beyond expectation, indicating that there was a need for it, and that the need was perceived as such by the community. Teaching has

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