Antitumor Activities of Human Placenta-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Endostatin on Ovarian Cancer

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Antitumor Activities of Human Placenta-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing Endostatin on Ovarian Cancer

Authors
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Volume
7
Issue
7
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039119
Keywords
  • Oncology
  • Biology
  • Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Stem Cells
  • Cancer Treatment
  • Gene Therapy
  • Developmental Biology
  • Research Article
  • Extracellular Matrix
  • Gene Function
  • Obstetrics And Gynecology
  • Mesenchymal Stem Cells
  • Molecular Cell Biology
  • Cellular Types
  • Antiangiogenesis Therapy
  • Extracellular Matrix Composition
  • Gynecologic Cancers

Abstract

Endostatin is an important endogenous inhibitor of neovascularization that has been widely used in anti-angiogenesis therapy for the treatment of cancer. However, its clinical application is largely hampered by its low efficacy. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hpMSCs) are particularly attractive cells for clinical use in cell-based therapies. In the present study, hpMSCs were isolated and characterized. We then evaluated the tumor targeting properties and antitumor effects of hpMSCs as gene delivery vehicles for ovarian cancer therapy. We efficiently engineered hpMSCs to deliver endostatin via adenoviral transduction mediated by Lipofectamine 2000. The tropism capacity of the engineered hpMSCs toward tumor cells was then confirmed by in vitro migration assays and in vivo by intraperitoneal injection of hpMSCs into nude mice. The hpMSCs expressing the human endostatin gene demonstrated preferential homing to the tumor site and significantly decreased the tumor volume without apparent systemic toxic effects. These observations were associated with significantly decreased blood sprouts and tumor cell proliferation as well as a dramatically increased tumor apoptosis index. These results suggested that hpMSCs are potentially an effective delivery vehicle for therapeutic genes for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

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