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Axisymmetric optical-trap measurement of red blood cell membrane elasticity.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Biomechanical Engineering
0148-0731
Publisher
ASME International
Publication Date
Volume
133
Issue
1
Pages
11007–11007
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1115/1.4003127
PMID: 21186897
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The elastic properties of the cell membrane play a crucial role in determining the equilibrium shape of the cell, as well as its response to the external forces it experiences in its physiological environment. Red blood cells are a favored system for studying membrane properties because of their simple structure: a lipid bilayer coupled to a membrane cytoskeleton and no cytoplasmic cytoskeleton. An optical trap is used to stretch a red blood cell, fixed to a glass surface, along its symmetry axis by pulling on a micron-sized latex bead that is bound at the center of the exposed cell dimple. The system, at equilibrium, shows Hookean behavior with a spring constant of 1.5×10(-6) N/m over a 1-2 μm range of extension. This choice of simple experimental geometry preserves the axial symmetry of the native cell throughout the stretch, probes membrane deformations in the small-extension regime, and facilitates theoretical analysis. The axisymmetry makes the experiment amenable to simulation using a simple model that makes no a priori assumption on the relative importance of shear and bending in membrane deformations. We use an iterative relaxation algorithm to solve for the geometrical configuration of the membrane at mechanical equilibrium for a range of applied forces. We obtain estimates for the out-of-plane membrane bending modulus B≈1×10(-19) Nm and an upper limit to the in-plane shear modulus H<2×10(-6) N/m. The partial agreement of these results with other published values may serve to highlight the dependence of the cell's resistance to deformation on the scale and geometry of the deformation.

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