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Autotoxicity and Alzheimer disease.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of Neurology
0003-9942
Publisher
American Medical Association
Publication Date
Volume
57
Issue
6
Pages
789–790
Identifiers
PMID: 10867774
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

I mmunological responses are considered to be either humoral, resulting from cloning of B lymphocytes, or cell mediated, resulting from cloning of T lymphocytes. Autoimmune diseases occur when the cloned products attack host tissue. Inflammation is considered a nonspecific response to injury, characterized by exudation of serum into damaged tissue, and identified by the cardinal signs of rubor, calor, dolor, and tumor. However, these classic mechanisms do not fit pathological observations of Alzheimer disease (AD)-affected brain tissue. Although many of the components prominently associated with peripheral immunological and inflammatory states are present in AD lesions, there are no identifiable B lymphocytes or antibodies, and T cells are sparse. Furthermore, the blood-brain barrier is intact, excluding exudation of exogenous serum proteins. Although "neuroinflammation" is the term commonly used to describe the pathological changes, it fails to define adequately the process that is taking place. The reaction is neither a nonspecific response to injury, as classically implied for inflammatory reactions, nor an autoimmune reaction, despite the directed attack against plaques and extracellular tangles. It is most appropriately defined as an innate immunoreaction. The fact that such a reaction can be mounted by brain, an organ frequently described as being immunologically privileged, suggests that a reevaluation is required of the dimensions of the innate immune system, including how it operates at the tissue level. The innate immune system is primitive, while the adaptive immune system, which is directed by peripheral immune organs, is an invention of vertebrates. Even in vertebrates, however, the innate immune system is the first line of defense. Much more needs to be learned about the operation of the innate immune system in health and disease. Arch Neurol. 2000.

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