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Autosomal Recessive Bestrophinopathy: Clinical Features, Natural History, and Genetic Findings in Preparation for Clinical Trials.

Authors
  • Casalino, Giuseppe1
  • Khan, Kamron N2
  • Armengol, Monica3
  • Wright, Genevieve4
  • Pontikos, Nikolas4
  • Georgiou, Michalis4
  • Webster, Andrew R4
  • Robson, Anthony G4
  • Grewal, Parampal S4
  • Michaelides, Michel5
  • 1 Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, United Kingdom; Oftalmico Hospital, ASST Fatebenefratelli Sacco, Milan, Italy. , (United Kingdom)
  • 2 Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 3 Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 4 Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, United Kingdom. , (United Kingdom)
  • 5 Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United Kingdom)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ophthalmology
Publication Date
May 01, 2021
Volume
128
Issue
5
Pages
706–718
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2020.10.006
PMID: 33039401
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To investigate the clinical course, genetic findings, and phenotypic spectrum of autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy (ARB) in a large cohort of children and adults. Retrospective case series. Patients with a detailed clinical phenotype consistent with ARB, biallelic likely disease-causing sequence variants in the BEST1 gene, or both identified at a single tertiary referral center. Review of case notes, retinal imaging (color fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, OCT), electrophysiologic assessment, and molecular genetic testing. Visual acuity (VA), retinal imaging, and electrophysiologic changes over time. Fifty-six eyes of 28 unrelated patients were included. Compound heterozygous variants were detected in most patients (19/27), with 6 alleles recurring in apparently unrelated individuals, the most common of which was c.422G→A, p.(Arg141His; n = 4 patients). Mean presenting VA was 0.52 ± 0.36 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR), and final VA was 0.81 ± 0.75 logMAR (P = 0.06). The mean rate of change in VA was 0.05 ± 0.13 logMAR/year. A significant change in VA was detected in patients with a follow-up of 5 years or more (n = 18) compared with patients with a follow-up of 5 years or less (n = 10; P = 0.001). Presence of subretinal fluid and vitelliform material were early findings in most patients, and this did not change substantially over time. A reduction in central retinal thickness was detected in most eyes (80.4%) over the course of follow-up. Many patients (10/26) showed evidence of generalized rod and cone system dysfunction. These patients were older (P < 0.001) and had worse VA (P = 0.02) than those with normal full-field electroretinography results. Although patients with ARB are presumed to have no functioning bestrophin channels, significant phenotypic heterogeneity is evident. The clinical course is characterized by a progressive loss of vision with a slow rate of decline, providing a wide therapeutic window for anticipated future treatment strategies. Copyright © 2020 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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